April 2016

Canadian Injury Prevention Resource

The Canadian Injury Prevention Resource (CIPR) is a comprehensive, evidence-based overview of injury prevention in Canada. The CIPR has over 500 pages of content from more than 60 contributing authors reflecting the Canadian experience around injury prevention. This resource aims to provide both individuals and Injury Prevention practitioners with basic understanding of the area.

The CIPR is free to download as a whole or in sections. Visit the Parachute website: www.parachutecanada.org/cipr

 

 

Related Content

Canadian Injury Prevention Curriculum
Fundamentals for Injury Prevention Practitioners
 

OIPPN Minutes

Communication Tools

July 2014

Workshop information

The OIPRC offers a number of workshops for public health practitioners. In the menu you will find descriptions of various workshops, along with slides from workshops the OIPRC has run for public health units in the past. Please contact us if you are interested in exploring the possibility of hosting an OIPRC workshop.

February 2018

Ontario Injury Data Report 2018

Parachute and the Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre are pleased to announce the release of the new Ontario Injury Data Report 2018 (OIDR 2018). An update from the 2012 edition, this new report presents the latest available counts and rates of injury related emergency room (ER) visits, hospital visits and deaths by cause of injury in Ontario from a province-wide perspective. 

ER visits and Hospital visits include cases in a two year period between April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2016 (Fiscal Years 2014/15- 2015/16). Deaths include cases within five calendar years, from 2008 to 2012. (Calendar Years 2008-2012)

Audience

The OIDR 2018 is useful for injury prevention practitioners, healthcare and public health professionals, as well as anyone with an interest in injury 

prevention.

Purpose

Data within the OIDR 2018 provides a province-specific view of the burden of injuries in Ontario, and can be used to identify vulnerable populations who may be at a higher risk for a particular cause of injury. Age and population specific data presented within the report can also be used to identify trends within injury morbidity and mortality in Ontario to inform the development and implementation of appropriate health promotion programming and injury prevention strategies.

Here are some Report highlights:

  • More than 2.4 million Ontarians visited an emergency room as a result of injuries in FY 2014-2016
  • Falls as the single highest contributor of ER visits across all age groups and causes of injury (N=850,003) in FY 2014-2016
  • Injuries accounted for approximately 144,000 hospital visits in FY 2014-2016.
  • Over 25,600 Ontarians died as a result of injuries in a five-year period between 2008-2012
  • Seniors older than 80 experienced most fall-related injuries resulting in ER visits (N=132,070) in FY 2014-2016

 

Download the Ontario Injury Report 2018

 

Active on Social Media?

Share the report and its findings with your networks using the Hashtag #OIDR2018 and tag us @ParachuteCanada and @OIPRC

Questions? Please direct your queries to:
Sunitha Ravi Kumar
Coordinator, Knowledge Translation
Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre (Parachute)
sravikumar@parachutecanada.org
647.776.5110

February 2018

Provincial Injury Initiatives - 2017

The Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre (OIPRC) is pleased to provide an overview of provincial injury initiatives as part of our mandate to facilitate communication and knowledge exchange among practitioners. This content provides a snapshot of initiatives in the areas of policy and research, as well as updates from provincial work groups.

Click here to view the September 2017 issue

February 2018

CFPC E-Learning - March 2 - April 6, 2018

The next session of the Canadian Falls Prevention Curriculum E-Learning course will be offered through the University of Victoria from March 2 to April 6, 2018 with instructor, Claude Meurehg, Capacity Building, Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre.

About the CFPC

The Canadian Falls Prevention Curriculum (CFPC) is a facilitated, on-line course offered through the University of Victoria Continuing Studies Department. The course is an evidence-based, award-winning and evaluated curriculum providing those working with older adults the knowledge and skills needed to apply a public health approach to the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries among older adults. With the support of an expert facilitator, participants learn how to design, implement and evaluate a fall prevention program tailored to health care or community setting by working through five lessons, incorporating interactive learning, group discussion and completion of a Program Implementation Worksheet.  All participants receive a University of Victoria certificate of completion and become members of the Canadian Fall Prevention Education Collaborative.

CFPC Participant testimonials:
“Excellent combination of evidence-based, practical component and theory. Great resources now more easily available to me”
“Excellent content, very practical and relevant. Really helps one to set up an actual program.”
“The flexibility to work at my own pace and the course content - excellent.”

Curriculum Format

This distant education course runs over five weeks - with approximately 20-25 self-directed hours needed to complete the course - and includes an optional orientation to on-line learning. Courses fill up quickly, so please register early to ensure a spot.

Registration

For more details and registration information please click on the link below, or contact Claude Meurehg at cmeurehg@parachutecanada.org

CFPC E-Learning Course - March 2 - April 6, 2018 Registration Details

More information about the course is also available at www.canadianfallprevention.ca including a link for ordering the course text: Fall Prevention Programming: Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Fall Prevention Programs for Older Adults. Lulu Publishing.

For more information or if you are interested in hosting a session, please contact Claude Meurehg at cmeurehg@parachutecanada.org or 647-776-5105.

Upcoming CFPC E-Learning Course

Highlighting Injury Prevention in Ontario:  It’s Worth the Investment

December 2017

Case Study 5: Ottawa first municipality in Canada to offer safeTALK training to every employee

Starting in the fall of 2015, Ottawa became the first large city to offer safeTALK to all of its public employees. The Canadian capital employs over 17,000 staff, all of whom will have the opportunity to sign up for the training. 

Over the last four years Ottawa Public Health (OPH) has partnered with the Ottawa Suicide Prevention Coalition and the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) to promote and deliver safeTALK workshops in the community and in workplaces.  SafeTALK is a half-day, evidence-based, suicide prevention workshop developed by LivingWorks.  It teaches anyone over the age of 15, regardless of prior experience or training, to become alert to suicide and the steps to follow in order to keep people with thoughts of suicide safe by connecting them to life-saving intervention resources.  The aim of this training in the workplace is to provide employers with skills in suicide prevention, to reduce stigma in the workplace and to encourage employees to reach out and seek support. The partnership between OPH, the Coalition and CMHA has allowed for a significant number of suicide prevention workshops to be conducted and community members to be trained.   Since 2011, the Coalition, CMHA and other partners have trained over 6,000 community members in safeTALK throughout Ottawa.

Recently the City of Ottawa added safeTALK to the corporate Learning Centre training curriculum, making it the first municipality in Canada to offer such training to all staff. The program is being offered through a partnership between Ottawa Public Health and the city’s Human Resources department.

Impact

  • Recent evaluation of the training in Ottawa has shown that 93% of participants now felt more comfortable to conduct a suicide intervention
  • safeTALK provides opportunity for participants to increase their suicide awareness, resolve myths about suicide, and improved knowledge of intervention skills
  • The training program offers participants guidance to consider how beliefs might impact a suicide intervention and to reflect on their willingness to intervene with a person who is distressed and having thoughts of suicide
  • LivingWorks program evaluations regularly reflect an increase in participants’ knowledge, skills, and confidence, while a major study recently demonstrated that they also contribute to improved outcomes for those at risk of suicide.

Resources   

December 2017

Case Study 4: Distracted Driving

Distracted driving is not just an issue for Ontario or Canada; the problem is a growing concern. Drivers who use cell phones are four times more likely to be in a collision than drivers who focus on the road. Based on current trends, distracted driving fatalities may overtake drinking and driving fatalities by 2016. Electronic communication device usage is prevalent among young drivers under the age of 25.

In an effort to combat distracted driving, the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) banned the use of hand-held communication and entertainment devices and display screens in 2009. The ban included texting, dialling and e-mailing, using iPods, MP3 players, laptop computers, DVD players, and programming a GPS device (other than by voice commands). The only penalties for distracted driving were fines.

MTO and road safety advocates who are interested in partnering with the ministry  assisted in the delivery of a province-wide social marketing campaign to address driver distraction and other initiatives related to Bill 31, Making Ontario Roads Safer Act, 2015. This Act includes stiffer penalties for distracted drivers.

Past experience has demonstrated that MTO can leverage their support in terms of the delivery of social marketing products, and public service announcements, etc. To that end, MTO hired an ad agency to develop and implement a province-wide social marketing and public education strategy:

  • The ad agency reached out to experts in medical, enforcement and safety organizations such as arrive alive Drive Sober, MADD, OPP, and Toronto Police among others, to get their insights 
  • Focus group testing took place in rural, northern, and 905, 416 area codes to gain insights from drivers aged 17 - 45
  • The strategy will identify the best and most effective media to reach targeted audiences 

The long-term objective of the Ministry is to effect change by changing attitudes, behaviour and mindsets, similar to what Ontario has already done with drinking and driving and seat belt usage.

Impact

  • On June 2, 2015, the province passed Bill 31, Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, 2015
  • Stiffer penalties upon conviction for distracted driving came into effect on September 15, 2015, including higher fines,  demerit points, and licence suspension for novice drivers

December 2017

Case Study 3: Promoting November 2015 as Fall Prevention Month in Ontario

In 2014, the Fall Prevention Community of Practice (www.fallsloop.com) identified the need to mobilize stakeholders in Ontario in a coordinated way to increase the impact of their work. Agencies were contacted to participate in the collaborative development and promotion of fall prevention messaging and activities during the month of November. This initiative mirrored the effort successfully implemented in Alberta.

Together, the Partners for Fall Prevention Month developed a theme and resources with the key message: It takes a community to prevent a fall - we all have a role to play.  All partners provided expertise and services to create a toolkit that included logos (in French and English).  The toolkit was housed on the Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre (OIPRC) website.  The initiative set a new precedent of a collaborative approach in Ontario. The resulting campaign attracted attention and interest from other Canadian provinces.

There were 1,791 unique downloads of the toolkit by the end of the November. The planning guides developed for exercise classes and the Check Your Balance activity were well received, as were the bilingual Fall Prevention month logos and the handout “Six Warning Signs of Falls.”

109 organizations reported participating in Fall Prevention Month, with at least one fall prevention initiative. At least 30 organizations partnered with other organizations to run their initiative. There were initiatives in all LHIN regions and a particularly strong showing in South West Ontario, with participation from varied sectors including public health, non-profit, private, government, university and hospital. 

Impact

  • 157 initiatives during November reached 6,165 individuals
  • Over 600 health care workers are more aware of fall prevention practices
  • The social media hashtag #PreventFalls2015 was used in 497 tweets and a few dozen   Facebook, LinkedIn and Tumblr posts
  • There were 96 different news pieces related to Fall Prevention Month

December 2017

Case Study 2: Kids Need a Boost - Booster Seat Campaign

Injuries are predictable and preventable, especially injuries in children that are due to motor vehicle collisions. Although legislated, the prevalence of correct booster seat use is low.  In Ontario, only 29.5% of children 4-8 years of age are correctly restrained.

The Child Safety Coalition of Middlesex-London, a community partnership, developed a booster seat campaign, Kids Need a Boost, implemented using the findings from the following evidence-based sources:

  • A systematic review that indicates types of effective strategies (Ehiri et al., 2006)
  • An example of an effective multi-faceted community education campaign (Ebel et al., 2003)
  • Information about the types of messages that are needed to increase booster seat use (Bruce et al., 2011)
  • A conceptual model of how product distribution is expected to change behaviour (Robinson et al., 2014)

An objective of the campaign is to raise awareness to parents and caregivers that booster seats are essential to the safety of their children. Education is provided to caregivers through health fairs, events, and presentations throughout London and Middlesex. Along with education to families, the campaign is offering free booster seats to those families who may qualify. A booster seat will be provided to families, as well as an information package that includes educational material about the use of booster seats and resources on where to go for help.

The goal of Kids Need a Boost is to reduce the incidence and severity of injuries caused by not using booster seats. The short term goals were to increase the parent/caregiver awareness of the benefits of  booster seats and to reduce cost barriers to booster seats for low income families.

Impact

  • The long term impact is to reduce incidence and severity of injuries caused by not using booster seats
  • Robinson et al., 2014 demonstrates successful behaviour change through product distribution over time
  • Future local evaluation is being planned

December 2017

Case Study 1: The Community Against Preventable Injuries (Preventable)

The Community Against Preventable Injuries (Preventable) is the first social marketing campaign targeted at reducing the burden of preventable injuries in British Columbia. 

The campaign works by broadcasting messages that are personal and relevant to a target population of those aged 25-55 years. This age group includes those who may be the parents of children and youth, as well as the children of older adults. The campaign is based on the phrase “You’re probably not expecting to…” completed by messages such as “…need a helmet today” and “…drown today.”

The Preventable campaign strives to create opportunities for people to use their imagination and draw their own conclusions about the risk of injury, rather than using scare tactics or a lecturing tone, which were found to be less effective with the target demographic. It was launched with a mass media blitz supported by ambient and guerrilla messaging in key locations, such as school zones, beaches, and workplaces, as well as television and online media as these have been proven to be the most effective channels to reach the target audience. 

Impact:

  • During the 2009-10 campaign period, there was a 26% decrease in injury deaths
  • Monitoring indicated a 5-10% positive shift in attitudes as self-reported precautionary actions,
  • as well as support for the Preventable brand
  • A significant reduction in deaths was seen for the 0-24 year age group during the same period, which represents the children of the target population

Preventable has also been implemented in Alberta and work is underway to bring it to the Atlantic provinces.

December 2017

Recommendations and moving forward

Keep this document for preventable injuries on hand to guide your work.  If you have not already, put injury prevention on the agenda in your local and provincial arenas.

Look into local regional data and see how it affects your local citizens

Link with other organizations that are likely to have an impact on your issue, such as organizations focusing on mental health, obesity, neurological conditions, etc.

Facilitate discussions or round tables to bring people together around injury prevention

Meet with influential people in your area and bring this document along

Educate yourself about evidence-based initiatives in Ontario and across Canada

Use social media to keep ideas alive 

Focus on the three mechanisms of injury that are the highest burden: falls, transportation, and suicide/self-harm.

However, injury is not exclusive to these three mechanisms. There may be others that are relevant to your community.

Look for synergies between strategies in injury prevention and other emerging priority areas of public health such as mental health, diabetes, obesity, cancer, substance misuse and neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s in order to make better use of resources and achieve the greatest positive impact.

 

It is time to work together to implement evidence-informed practices that prevent injuries so that we can live long lives to the fullest

December 2017

When the story changes…

 

These headlines above represent patterns that are just a small fraction of all that appear in our media everyday; they are headlines of events that resulted in injury and injury-related death that were predictable and preventable.

Each one of these events resulted in high direct costs to the health care system and indirect costs to the individual, family, and community. Let’s reflect on these situations. Health care costs include sending paramedics to the scene, the ambulance to the hospital, acute hospital treatment followed by rehabilitation. Some injuries may require a number of surgeries. The patient may be transported by air or ambulance to a trauma centre or a centre with a specialty such as toxicology. Family may need to take time off work and pay for accommodation close to the treatment centre, thus leaving the rest of the family in the care of others. If additional treatment is needed over the years, the family may need to take more time off work, pay for food and accommodation, and pay for caregiving for the rest of the family.  These are only some of the immediate repercussions of injuries and death, but there are many others that cannot be quantified, such as emotional trauma, permanent partial or full disability, altered career implications, dramatic changes in future roles in family and society, loss of independent living and the necessity for institutional care.  Table 2 shows a list of potential costs:

Evidence-Informed Practices 

Reducing injuries by just 20% WOULD SAVE OVER $1.7 BILLION AND MORE THAN 1,100 LIVES IN ONE YEAR.

The following case studies are examples of promising practices.

  • The Community Against Preventable Injuries (Preventable) is the first social marketing campaign targeted at reducing the burden of preventable injuries in British Columbia. This campaign strives to create opportunities for people to use their imagination and draw their own conclusions about the risks of injury.  The impact has been very positive, showing a 26% decrease in injury deaths during the 2009-10 campaign period.
  • Kids Need A Boost is a booster seat campaign that aims to reach out to the parents and caregivers of the high number of children (70%) who are not using boosters despite needing to do so.  The initiative led by the Child Safety Coalition of Middlesex-London, offers educational events as well as booster seats at no cost.
  • Promoting November 2015 as Fall Prevention Month in Ontario was an initiative involving 109 organizations that led 157 activities during the month of November, reaching over 6,165 individuals, mainly through educational events.  Social media was leveraged and helped engage local media, producing 96 news pieces related to Fall Prevention Month.
  • Distracted Driving, a worldwide issue mostly among drivers under 25, has been addressed by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO), which banned the use of hand-held communication and entertainment devices and display screens in 2009.  Stiffer penalties such as higher fines and demerit points as well as licence suspension for novice drivers upon conviction have the objective of effecting changes in attitudes, behaviour and mindsets akin to those already achieved in the areas of drinking and driving and seatbelt use.
  • SafeTALK is a half-day, evidence-based, suicide prevention workshop offered since 2015 by the City of Ottawa.  The city’s initiative is the result of a partnership with the Ottawa Suicide Prevention Coalition and the Canadian Mental Health Association to promote and deliver safeTALK workshops in the community and in workplaces.  Evaluations have shown improved outcomes for those at risk of suicide.

While these case studies represent a good start, they are not enough on their own.  Efforts like these need to be considered, implemented, expanded and sustained.  For full text on these cases see Appendix 1.

December 2017

Introduction

Everyone is at risk for injury. It is a serious societal and global issue with huge health, social, and economic implications, underscored by the fact that injuries claim the lives of 15,866 Canadians each year, with 5,785 of those deaths in Ontario alone.

Understanding how, when, and where injuries occur allows us to effectively challenge the notion that they occur by chance, emphasizing that injuries are predictable, controllable, and preventable events.

This document provides a basis for public health and injury prevention practitioners in Ontario to guide their approach when interacting with decision-makers to make a case for support. 

Why is injury prevention important?

Injuries are a substantial cause of death and disability in Canada, but they are preventable. A Canadian study published in the American Journal of Public Health, “Diverging Trends in the Incidence of Occupational and Nonoccupational Injury in Ontario, 2004–2011,” shows that if injuries due to leisure, recreation or other non-work activities had fallen at the same rate as work-related injuries, there would have been 200,000 fewer injuries in Ontario in 2011. Dr. Cameron Mustard, one of the study’s authors, says, “A decline of 30 per cent in work-related injuries in just eight years is evidence that prevention efforts can have an impact.”  This speaks volumes to the need of systematically investing in community based interventions and strategies aimed at increasing awareness, demystifying injuries, implementing evidence-informed practices and expanding successful interventions across the province.

Moreover, it has been shown that prevention is extremely cost effective.  Table 1 below shows some positive examples: 

The data

It is important to note that injuries affect people disproportionately, with certain groups experiencing higher injury frequency and/or severity than others. In general, lower socioeconomic status (SES), which includes factors such as education level, employment, and ethnicity, is associated with a higher risk for major injury and injury-related death. In Ontario, children and young adults in the lowest income areas are 40% more likely to be injured than those in the highest income areas.

The economic burden of injury is immense across Canada. In fact, injuries result in a larger burden than some chronic conditions, such as heart disease and stroke. For example, in Alberta the emergency department cost of injury is $176 million while heart and stroke is $46 million, and cancer is $8 million.  It is important to note that an October 2015 report from Alberta highlighted the complex relationships between prevalent chronic diseases and common types of injury, which helps make evident that injury is wrongly perceived as a small issue in comparison to chronic disease.

Working together

Over the years research has identified the types of injuries that contribute to the greatest burden, the groups that are most affected, the societal factors that have an impact on injury rates and the solutions that are proven to make a difference.

A comprehensive framework for injury prevention can address a broad range of risk factors and provides opportunity for intervention at many levels. Public health has a mandate for, as well as a long history of, collaboration with other stakeholders in law enforcement, fire, education, healthcare, and the Ministry of Transportation, among others.  The multi-faceted approach taken by public health uniquely positions it to work collaboratively with the community, public, and private sectors to create and mobilize comprehensive strategies to take action. Comprehensive injury prevention looks beyond individual knowledge and skills and includes action on policy, social and physical environments.  Many of these strategies include the 3 E’s of Injury Prevention:  Education, Enforcement and Engineering.   A comprehensive strategy increases the likelihood of success.

Aging with Confidence:  Ontario’s Action Plan for Seniors

Webinar:  Water Safety on the Farm - Preventing Child and Youth Drownings

Webinar:  Alcohol Harm in Canada

November 2017

Fall-related Injuries in Young Children Aged 0-6

This Ontario Injury Compass presents emergency department (ED) visit data for injuries related to falls for children aged 0-6. It also includes environmental and behavioral strategies for parents and caregivers to help prevent falls in young children.

WEBINAR:  Preventing Child Falls, the Latest Trends & Prevention Strategies - EXTENDED REGISTRATION!

October 2017

New Report: Applying situational assessment skills to address opioid-related harms

On May 9, 2017, PHO held a one-day workshop for public health professionals to build local capacity in skills for conducting situational assessments. The workshop helped to identify key considerations for applying these methods to inform local planning to address opioid-related harms.

From this workshop, PHO developed the report – Applying situational assessment skills to address opioid-related harms: Workshop report.

The report shares discussion summaries, presentations and panelist experiences from the workshop to support local public health organizations to:

  • understand the steps of conducting a situational assessment
  • apply systematic methods for conducting your own situational assessment
  • inform community action plans to reduce opioid-related harms

For more information about this report, please contact hpcb@oahpp.ca.

October 2017

The Chief Public Health Officer’s Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2017

The Chief Public Health Officer’s Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2017 – Designing Healthy Living

The report was developed through strong collaboration with a variety of partners, experts and stakeholders.

This year’s report can be accessed through this link:

Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2017

October 2017

2018 TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY CONFERENCE

The Toronto Rehabilitation Institute's annual Traumatic Brain Injury Conference is a national conference dedicated to advance knowledge on traumatic brain injury in scientific research and clinical care.

Join TRI on February 2, 2018 at the Beanfield Centre at Exhibition Place in Toronto.  For details, please click on:

2018 TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY CONFERENCE

October 2017

4TH CANADIAN FALL PREVENTION CONFERENCE - St. John’s, June 11-12 ,2018

The website for the 2018 Fall Prevention Conference is up!  Please take a look:

4TH CANADIAN FALL PREVENTION CONFERENCE

June 11-12
SHERATON HOTEL NEWFOUNDLAND
St. John's, Newfoundland


 

October 2017

Social Determinants of Health Map - Interactive Tool

Public Health Ontario just launched a new Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) Map. The SDOH Map is an online interactive tool that shows the distribution of upstream social determinants of health across the province, Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN) and public health units (PHU).


The tool is customizable to allow for specific analysis and comparison. The Map allows to:

- select the indicators that are most relevant for your work
- outline the data specific to your LHIN and/or PHU boundary
- compare two indicators directly on the Map
- download the raw data to do your own analysis

To go to the map, please click on the link:

Social Determinants of Health Map

September 2017

Electrical Safety at Home - #nosafeshock

Parachute and the Electrical Safety Authority have paired up this fall to support communities across Ontario promote electrical safety in their regions and bring awareness to "Electrical Safety at Home". The goal of the campaign is to empower Parents/Caregivers with knowledge and resources and help keep children from electrical-related harm in their home.

Download the Community Toolkit and Resources with this link

The Parachute Vision Zero Network 2nd Annual Summit

The Public in Public Health - Fall Forum

Envisioning Ageing in Place Conference

Membership List (Updated August 2017)

Consultation Letter - Ontario Government

Concussion in Women and Girls

August 2017

New Impaired Driving Resources

The Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addicition has updated their Drug-Impaired Driving Toolkit to include key messages about impaired driving for people living in rural and remote areas. These messages are informed by discussions with the governments of the Yukon and the Northwest Territories.

Click here to see the toolkit

In addition to the key messages, they have also added a new poster to our Toolkit.  This poster can be downloaded to promote the message that impaired driving applies to all motorized vehicles, including boats and off-road vehicles.

Click here to download the poster

June 2017 Minutes

Lower Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines (June 2017)

CPHA Presentation June 29/17

June 2017

Injuries from Falls Involving Skateboards and In-line Skates

To help better understand the issue, this Ontario Injury Compass presents emergency department (ED) visit data for injuries related to falls involving skateboards and in-line skates for those 0-14 years, as well as strategies to prevent injuries resulting from a fall.  

 

Related Content

Fundamentals for Injury Prevention Practitioners

 

Subscribe to the Compass

The Ontario Injury Compass provides an analysis of injury issues in Ontario. Each report provides a snapshot of the most recent data available on the given topic.  By signing up, you can automatically receive notification when the reports are released. 

To sign up, please send an email to compass-subscribe@oiprc.parachutecanada.org.

Advocacy Letter Template (Bill C-45)

Terms of Reference

Terms of Reference

Home

April 2017 Minutes

OPHA Presentation

April 2017

Drinking & Driving Among Women in Ontario:  A Qualitative Study

The Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) published a new study to investigate knowledge, attitudes and perceptions among women in Ontario and their experiences in relation to drinking and driving. This project was undertaken with support from the Ontario  Women’s Health Network (OWHN) and was funded by Beer Canada through its continued support of Change the Conversation program. Drinking and driving continues to be a cause for concern despite a substantial decline in alcohol impaired driving rates in Canada over the last 30 years. 

Although there has consistently been a lower rate of impaired driving among women as compared to men, incidents among women have increased in the past two decades. In 2015, women account for 1 in 5 reported incidents of impaired driving whereas in 1986 they represented just 1 in 13. The goal of this research project was to explore the factors that may contribute to driving after drinking behaviours among women. Key findings from this project will inform the development of more targeted prevention messaging that reflects the experiences of women, and more effective strategies to reach this audience to help to reverse this trend. Products emerging from the study will contain tailored preventive messaging and include several resources and fact sheets that will be shared through Change the Conversation, TIRF’s national education program on impaired driving.

Click here to download the TIRF report

http://www.oninjuryresources.ca/downloads/news/19f0ec64-379f-480e-a6ea-bdd68fb43c93.jpg

Presentation to alPHa (2017

RNAO Cannabis Articles

February 2017 Minutes

Best Start Conference 2017 - Key Messages

CCSA Presentation February 2017

Overview of the Government’s Approach

Membership List (Update March 2017)

March 2017

Injuries from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Ontario

In this report, we examine Emergency Department (ED) visits for injuries related to Carbon Monoxide poisoning in Ontario between 2011-2015, as well as provide some in depth analysis for 2015, the latest year of data available when this report was prepared.  

In the 5 year period between 2011-2015, there were more than 4,000 ED visits related to CO Poisoning in Ontario. Alarmingly, the rate of CO Poisoning was the highest in 2013 (920 visits) and 2014 (927 visits) translating to an average rate of 6.78 visits per 100,000 in 2013 and 2014. 

Some takeaways of this report include the following:

  • 4,000 ED visits related to CO Poisoning were noted between 2011-2015 in Ontario. 
  • 858 Ontario-based ED visits related to CO Poisoning were noted in 2015 alone
  • In 2015, Children (0-9 yrs) accounted for 101 ED visits related to CO Poisoning
  • Males between 25-44 years of age accounted for the highest number of ED Visits (171) related to CO Poisoning in 2015. 
  • Adults between the ages of 25-64 years accounted for the highest number of ED Visits (493) related to CO Poisoning in 2015

Referenced in this report

1. Newsroom: Government of Ontario. Backgrounder Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week. Retrieved from: https:// news.ontario.ca/mcscs/en/2015/11/carbon-monoxide-awareness-week-1.html

2. Health Canada. (2016). Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. Retrieved from: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/air-quality/indoor-air-contaminants/keep-carbon-monoxide-out-your-home.html

3. Parachute. (n.d.). Home Safety: Around the House. Retrieved from: http://www.parachutecanada.org/injury-topics/item/home-safety-around-the-house

4. Ontario Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services. Carbon Monoxide Alarm Questions and Answers. Retrieved from: http://www.mcscs.jus.gov.on.ca/english/FireMarshal/ CarbonMonoxideAlarms/QuestionsandAnswers/OFM_COAlarms_QandA.html 

Additional resources on this topic

Parachute's eLearning Course - Poison Prevention in Children 0-6 years

Prevent Child Injury – preventchildinjury.ca

The Canadian Atlas of Child & Youth Injury Prevention - injuryevidence.ca

Subscribe to the Compass

The Ontario Injury Compass provides an analysis of injury issues in Ontario. Each report provides a snapshot of the most recent data available on the given topic.  By signing up, you can automatically receive notification when the reports are released. 

To sign up, please send an email to compass-subscribe@oiprc.parachutecanada.org.

Ontario Injury Compass provides an analysis of injury issues in Ontario. Each report provides a snapshot of the most recent data available on the given topic.  By signing up, you can automatically receive notification when the reports are released. 

To sign up, please send an email to compass-subscribe@oiprc.parachutecanada.org.

December 2016

Injuries from Falls on Stairs in Ontario

In 2015, there were more than 50,000 emergency visits for injuries from falls on stairs in Ontario. As a cause of falls leading to ED visits, stairs were exceeded only by slips and trips on the same level. 

This Ontario Injury Compass presents emergency visit data for injuries related to falls on stairs, as well as leading strategies to prevent these falls from occurring. 

Referenced in this Report

Health Canada. (2012). Is Your Child Safe?

Parachute. (2011). Child Safety Good Practice Guide: Good investments in unintentional child injury prevention and safety promotion - Canadian Edition. Toronto: Parachute.

Ontario Child Injury Prevention Committee. Prevent Child Injury: Key Messages for Preventing Child Injuries among Children 0-36 Months of Age.

Parachute. (n.d.). Home Safety: Around the House

Joint Task Group on Step Dimensions in Dwelling Units. (2013). Report on Step Dimensions in Dwelling Units. (n.p.): Joint Task Group on Step Dimensions in Dwelling Units.

Scott, V. (2012). Fall Prevention Programming: Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Fall Prevention Programs for Older Adults. Raleigh, North Carolina: Lulu Publishing. 

Related Content

Canadian Falls Prevention Curriculum

Fall Prevention Month

Evidence-Informed Practice Recommendations

Summary of Recommendations - Task Force Consultation

November 2016 Minutes

Cannabis and Road Safety - Policy Challenges

CCSA- A Guide to Facilitate Discussions about Youth Cannabis Use

CCSA - Myth Busting Link

Online Learning E-Module (Cannabis Use during Adolescence)

Marijuana and Youth Resource List

Maternal Cannabis Use Backgrounder (2016)

Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health BoH Report

Niagara Region BoH Report

A Beginner’s Guide to Aging Successfully: Move it or lose it!

September Minutes

Partager des connaissances avec les conseillers des décideurs politiques

Sharing Knowledge with the Advisors of Policy Makers: A Couple of Myths, a Couple of Tips

Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis - Part 2

Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis - Part 1

Haliburton Transportation Summit

School Zone Safety Workshop

CCSA - The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence Report

Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations - M Word Conference

CanniMed Presentation - M Word Conference

The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence PP - CCSA 2015

Canadian Pharmacists Association - Submission to Federal Task Force

Non-Smokers’ Rights Association - Submission to Federal Task Force

Health Canada’s Task Force Discussion Paper

Cannabis - A Public Health Approach Briefing Note (SMDHU)

Considering Marijuana Legalization - Research Report

Toronto Public Health - Board of Health Report

Cannabis - A Public Health Approach (Middlesex-London)

CMA Submission to Federal Task Force

Submission to Federal Task Force - Cover Letter Template

Submission to Federal Task Force

Environmental Scan

June 2016 Minutes

Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week

Falls & Mobility Network Annual Meeting

2017 Ontario Injury Prevention Forum

September 2016

Young Driver Injuries in Ontario

In 2015, there were over 7,000 emergency department (ED) visits for injuries to young drivers in Ontario. This figure averages to 20 young people seen in emergency each day.

This issue of the Ontario Injury Compass presents emergency visit data for motor vehicle collisions where the injured person was the driver of the vehicle and between the ages of 16 and 24. It also highlights prevention strategies targeting young and inexperienced drivers. 

Referenced in this report

Transport Canada. (2011). Road Safety in Canada. Ottawa: Government of Canada.

Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre. (2014). Evidence-Informed Practice Recommendations. Toronto: Parachute.

Phillips, R.O., Ulleberg, P., & Vaa, T. (2009). Do road safety campaigns work? A meta-analysis of road safety campaign effects. In S. Forward & A. Kazemi (Eds.), A Theoretical Approach to Assess Road Safety Campaigns (pp. 25-45). Brussels: Belgian Road Safety Institute.

Robertson, R.D., & Pashley, C.R. (2015). Road Safety Campaigns: What the Research Tells Us. In Community-Based Toolkit for Road Safety Campaigns. Ottawa: TIRF.

Phillips, R.O., Ulleberg, P., & Vaa, T. (2011). Meta- analysis of the effect of road safety campaigns on accidents. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43, 1204-1218.

Vanlaar, W. Pashley, C., Mayhew, D., Robertson, R., & Mainegra Hing, M. (2014). Understanding Young Drivers in Ontario: FInal Report. Ottawa: TIRF. 

Additional resources on this topic

Parachute's National Teen Driver Safety Week resources

TIRF's Young and New Driver Resource Centre

Trends among Fatally Injured Teen Drivers, 2000 – 2012

Community-Based Toolkit for Road Safety Campaigns

Ontario Ministry of Transportation's Distracted Driving page

Related Content

Distracted Driving in Ontario, Ontario Injury Compass, October 2014

Transport-related injuries in Ontario, Ontario Injury Compass, March 2014

Fundamentals for Injury Prevention Practitioners - Module 2: Common Types of Injuries and their Risk Factors

Fundamentals for Injury Prevention Practitioners - Module 3: Injury Prevention Strategies

2016 Not By Accident Conference

Concussion & MVC Documents

September 2016

Provincial Injury Initiatives - 2016

The Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre (OIPRC) is pleased to provide an overview of provincial injury initiatives as part of our mandate to facilitatecommunication and knowledge exchange among practitioners. This content provides a snapshot of initiatives in the areas of policy and research, as well as updates from provincial work groups. 

Click here to view the September 2016 Issue

Arrive Alive Conference

September 2016

Media Support

Here you can find sentences, testimonials, sample tweets and Facebook posts to support the distribution of the document.

Content to come

September 2016

Media Support

Here you can find suggested sentences, testimonials, sample tweets and facebook posts to support the distribution of the document.

Content to come

September 2016

Communications Templates

Here you can download templates designed to support the distribution of the document to all relevant stakeholders.

Template introductory email

Template presentation slides

Ontario Injury Compass provides an analysis of injury issues in Ontario. Each report provides a snapshot of the most recent data available on the given topic.  By signing up, you can automatically receive notification when the reports are released. 

To sign up, please send an email to compass-subscribe@oiprc.parachutecanada.org.