April 2009

Alcohol and Violence: Raising the Bar

Please join the Alcohol Policy Network and the Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre as they facilitate a teleconference on alcohol and violence.

The presentation provides a summary of research, theory and practice described in the recent book by Graham and Homel (2008). It starts with discussion of a model of bar violence that draws on situational crime prevention, routine activities and social interaction theory. The model includes the role of alcohol, the patrons who frequent bars, staff who work in licensed settings, the barroom environment, social process leading to aggression and the larger regulatory environment. The second part of the presentation focuses on the different approaches that have been developed for preventing bar violence including evidence of their effectiveness.

If you are interested in joining this FREE teleconference, presented by Dr. Kathryn Graham of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health on Tuesday, May 5, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. EST, the Alcohol Policy Network and the Ontario Injury Prevention Resource Centre invite you to complete the registration form found at:


Click here to download an MP3 recording of the session


Note: to save this file on your computer, please right click it and select the "Save Link As" option The presentation provides a summary of research, theory and practice described in the recent book by Graham and Homel (2008). It starts with discussion of a model of bar violence that draws on situational crime prevention, routine activities and social interaction theory. The model includes the role of alcohol, the patrons who frequent bars, staff who work in licensed settings, the barroom environment, social process leading to aggression and the larger regulatory environment. The second part of the presentation focuses on the different approaches that have been developed for preventing bar violence including evidence of their effectiveness.

The objectives of this learning teleconference are:

  1. Bar violence usually results from a combination of factors and much of it can be prevented or at least minimized.; 
  2. Strategies for preventing bar violence can focus on any or all of the factors that contribute to bar violence and can be directed at multiple levels from staff training to community policies. 

This learning teleconference will be moderated by Dr. Kathryn Graham, a Senior Scientist and Head of Social and Community Prevention Research in the Social, Prevention and Health Policy Research Department at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

Updated April 20, 2009